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Sunday, November 12, 2017

This week (November 13-19)

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Last day for Martin Luther King, Jr Leadership Award nominations

noon La Crosse Interfaith Justice and Peace Coalition meeting at 420 West Ave S.


6:00 p.m. PUBLIC HEARING on La Crosse County Budget for 2018 including plan to end County's mosquito control, possibility of dropping our of local CofC, a conservative Republican-connected group (in fact, there are good arguments for many businesses and non profits to disconnect from this group), and more in County Administrative Building, 6th & State. 

6:30 p.m. Weigent-Hogan Neighborhood Association monthly meeting at 401 West Avenue South

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14
noon League of Women Voters - Neighborhood Perspectives on Poverty (lunch registration is closed but you may go for the program) at Moxie's, 1835 Rose Street

4:00 p.m. Indoor Farmers' Market at the La Crescent Community Center

5:00 p.m. International Coffee Hour - gender roles at UWL's Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall

6:30 p.m. Storytime for Adults hosted by La Crosse Public Library at Turtlestack Brewery,  

7:00 p.m. Indivisible/New Directions meeting at 401 West Ave S

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15
10:00 a.m. Habitat for Humanity Info Session at the ReStore between Woodman's and West Salem off of Highway 16 (Public transportation available for La Crosse, Holmen, Ona, West Salem)

4:30 p.m. La Crosse Area Planning Committee (many transportation issues will be discussed) public may speak at Rm 1107 County Admin Building (6th and State)

5:30 p.m. Fundraiser for Wisconsin Supreme Court candidate Tim Burns at 3039 Edgewater Lane (French Island) (or donate online)

6:45 p.m. Powell-Poage-Hamilton Neighborhood Assn monthly meeting at Southside Neighborhood Center

7:00 p.m. Driftless Reader Publication Party at Driftless Books and Music, Viroqua

7:00 p.m. Photographic History of the La Crosse River Marsh in Room 1400 Centennial Hall, UWL 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16
10 a.m. Trans Day of Remembrance exhibit opens at UWL Hall of Nations

5:30 p.m. Driftless Reader readings at the Root Note

6:00 p.m. Habitat for Humanity Info Session at the ReStore between Woodman's and West Salem off of Highway 16 (Public transportation available (but ends at 7 p.m.) for La Crosse, Holmen, Ona, West Salem)

7:15 p.m. Trans Day of Remembrance vigil at the UWL Clocktower 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17
1:00 p.m. Planning meeting for 2018 La Crosse Juneteenth Celebration (in September 2018)

3:00 p.m. Habitat for Humanity Info Session at the ReStore between Woodman's and West Salem off of Highway 16 (Public transportation available for La Crosse, Holmen, Ona, West Salem)

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18
10:00 a.m. Habitat for Humanity Info Session at the ReStore between Woodman's and West Salem off of Highway 16 (Public transportation available for La Crosse, Holmen, Ona, West Salem)

7:00 p.m. A Chef's Story at the Uptowne, 1217 Caledonia (MUST RESERVE at link) 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19
10:00 a.m. Winter Farmers' Market at Myrick Park Center

5:00 p.m. Vernon County Dems annual board elections at 120 N Rusk, Viroqua

Also coming up on Monday, November 20 - La Crosse County Democratic Party board elections. You MUST be a party member by November 14 (ok, it's really the 15th, but do it by the 14th, ok?) We need everyone who works for, donates to, and votes for Dem candidates to join the party so its candidates and priorities are those of the people. 


And Guy shared this opinion piece by Winona LaDuke, I Am Tired of Being Invisible to You All. For some reason, only November is designated as Native American Heritage Month, but really, every month should be Native American Heritage Month or Native American Real True History Month and What are we going to do about it. At the very least. Please read and consider, how can we start to make needed changes?

Here's a short except. Please read the whole thing.
November is Native American Heritage month. Before that, of course, is Halloween. Until about three years ago, one of the most popular Halloween costumes was Pocahontas. People know nothing about us, but they like to dress up like us or have us as a mascot.

We are invisible. Take it from me. I travel a lot, and often ask this question: Can you name 10 indigenous nations? Often, no one can name us. The most common nations named are Lakota, Cherokee, Navajo, Cheyenne and Blackfeet—mostly native people from western movies. This is the problem with history. If you make the victim disappear, there is no crime. And we just disappeared. When I travel, I get this feeling someone has seen a unicorn in the airport. That would be me, in my Pendleton jacket. I often get that awkward question if I am Navajo or Cherokee. But here's what I want people to know today about native Americans: There are over 700 indigenous nations in North America. In Guatemala and Bolivia, we are the majority population. Two indigenous presidents have been elected—Evo Morales in Bolivia and Hugo Chavez in Venezuela. We are doctors, lawyers, writers, educators, and we are here. We are land-based, and intend to stay that way. I hear Minnesotans talk about how the Americans gave us land. America was stolen or purchased for a pittance. President Andrew Jackson forced the removal of thousands of our people, and then sold our land. Historians point out that Jackson's Louisiana Purchase knocked U.S. debt from $58 million in 1828 to $38,000 in 1834. Good deal, except for us.



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